Bayeux tapestry images in order

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bayeux tapestry images in order

1066: The Hidden History in the Bayeux Tapestry by Andrew Bridgeford

The most famous tapestry in the world isnt actually a tapestry at all, but somehow, The Bayeux Wool-Embroidered-on-Linen doesnt have the same kick, does it?

This almost millennial work of art resides in the city of Bayeux in Normandy. Over 230 feet long and approx. 1.6 feet wide, the tapesty is a vibrant, colorful, stylistic representation of the events leading up to and including the Battle of Hastings in 1066, in which William the Conqueror envaded Anglo-Saxon England, defeated and killed its last king, Harold, and changed the course of English history forever. In fact, as author Bridgeford points out, had William lost, the English language as we all now know it wouldnt have been English at all, but closer to a Germanic form.

Bridgeford is a wonderful writer, and embues what might have been a dry, academic story with intrigue, mystery and page-turning interest. He provides a scene by scene descriptive account of the story unfolding on the linen, and makes some speculative observations that, while not conclusive, do seem to have some validity as to the nature of the tapestry. To wit: Who actually commissioned the tapestry to be made? Why has it lasted over 900 years virtually intact? Is the tapestry merely a glorious work of Norman boasting, or is there a subversive Anglo-Saxon counter-story sewn into it as well? And what to make of some of the woolen characters who populate the piece: a dwarf, a mysterious lady with sexual connotations surrounding her, two lesser knights who are specifically named, and a French nobleman who comes in for a wide share of the Norman glory. Bridgefords research reveals some tantalizing clues about these questions and more.

Reader, I was hooked, and if youre a fan of the Bayeux Tapestry, of speculative non-fiction, or just want a good read, well told, this books for you.
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Published 11.12.2018

The Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeux Tapestry: The story in six scenes

But what exactly is the tapestry, how old is it, and why is it important? By David Musgrove. The Bayeux Tapestry tells one of the most famous stories in British history — that of the Norman Conquest of England in , particularly the battle of Hastings, which took place on 14 October The Bayeux Tapestry is not a tapestry at all, but rather an embroidery. The tapestry is some 68m long and is composed of several panels that were produced separately and then eventually sewn together to form one long whole.

The Bayeux Tapestry tells the story of William of Normandy's invasion of England and of it's King Harold, and the Battle of Hastings in as well as the events immediately following. The Tapestry is a journey, just as a film is a journey, with players, backgrounds, action, love, hate, desire and above all, a blockbuster ending. It is also, as most historians agree, incomplete. The Tapestry most ikely had another section which has been lost in time. The section that is believed to be missing could have contained the glorious ending of William The Conqueror's coronation, December 25th,

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It is thought to date to the 11th century, within a few years after the battle. It tells the story from the point of view of the conquering Normans, but is now agreed to have been made in England.

The Bayeux Tapestry tells one of the most famous stories in British history — that of the Norman Conquest of England in , particularly the battle of Hastings, which took place on 14 October But who made the tapestry and how long did it take? What materials were used and how was it stitched? And how has the tapestry survived for nearly 1, years? We have no sources to tell us who made the Bayeux Tapestry; however, most scholars agree that it was made in Norman England, probably by Anglo-Saxon embroiderers.

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