Decline and fall on savage street

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decline and fall on savage street

Decline and Fall on Savage Street by Fiona Farrell

A fascinating novel about a house with a fanciful little turret, built by a river. Unfolding within its rooms are lives of event and emotional upheaval. A lot happens. And the tumultuous events of the twentieth century also leave their mark, from war to economic collapse, the deaths of presidents and princesses to new waves of music, art, architecture and political ideas. Meanwhile, a few metres away in the river, another creature follows a different, slower rhythm.And beneath them all, the planet moves to its own immense geological time. With insight, wide-ranging knowledge and humour, this novel explores the same territory as its non-fiction twin, The Villa at the Edge of the Empire. Writing in a city devastated by major earthquakes, Fiona Farrell rebuilds a brilliant, compelling and imaginative structure from bits and pieces salvaged from one hundred years of history. A lot has happened. This is how it might have felt.
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Published 16.12.2018

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It is complete. And it is a rich and endlessly rewarding read. It is the connecting point, a node, where stories of characters, who lived in the house, intersect. It is a salvage book. Material for rich and powerful stories was sourced from real life stories, talks with friends and random strangers at the petrol stations, newspapers, books. This book certainly is BIG and its greatness will grow with each single reading. You are commenting using your WordPress.

Unfolding within its rooms are lives of event and emotional upheaval. A lot happens. And the tumultuous events of the twentieth century also leave their mark, from war to economic collapse, the deaths of presidents and princesses to new waves of music, art, architecture and political ideas. With insight, wide-ranging knowledge and humour, this novel explores the same territory as its non-fiction twin, The Villa at the Edge of the Empire. Writing in a city devastated by major earthquakes, Fiona Farrell rebuilds a brilliant, compelling and imaginative structure from bits and pieces salvaged from one hundred years of history. It think we will look back at these two books [ Decline and Fall on Savage Street and The Villa at the Edge of Empire ] and think of them as being very important in our local literary history as marking time and place and moment and feeling; it's a wonderful piece of art. Primarily this is because, rather than anchoring her text to dry, historical minutiae, Farrell chooses to ground it to people, particularly family.

What makes a novel political? What follows is accomplished, rich and moving what goes better with wine than sweet words? And why is it that her most recent work, the novel Decline and Fall on Savage Street , the companion volume to The Villa at the Edge of Empire, is the only one of her works that has been dubbed political? Fiona agrees with Carol Hanisch that the personal is political; you cannot escape it. Every imagining is inescapably political — all of her own works are political for they are the product and culmination of her Irish ancestors arriving here, having an education and the good health to write, and the readers with the money to buy her books.

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