Carl jung a man and his symbols

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carl jung a man and his symbols

Man and His Symbols by C.G. Jung

My university professors never introduced me to Carl Jung. I understand why, I guess, but its a shame that I didnt read Jungs work until now. Jungian psychology is amazing. It addresses the unconscious and the self/psyche in a unique and enlightening way. And, unlike most other psychologists, Jung did not shy away from unexplained phenomena and the so-called paranormal. His theory provides insights into unexplained phenomena and is the only major psychological theory that includes the paranormal in a way that doesnt dismiss it as nonsense. I cant recommend this book highly enough. I strongly encourage whoever is reading this sentence to purchase a copy of Man and His Symbols immediately. You wont regret it. Its one of the best books Ive ever read. I plan to read the rest of Jungs writings now.
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'Man and his Symbols' Carl G Jung Part 2

Man and His Symbols

Look Inside. Aug 15, ISBN Feb 01, ISBN The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the reader will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history.

Man and His Symbols is the last work undertaken by Carl Jung before his death in First published in , it is divided into five parts, four of which were written by associates of Jung: Marie-Louise von Franz , Joseph L. The book, which contains numerous illustrations, seeks to provide a clear explanation of Jung's complex theories for a wide non-specialist readership. The last year of his life was devoted almost entirely to this book, and when he died in June , his own section was complete he finished it, in fact, only some 10 days before his final illness and his colleagues' chapters had all been approved by him in draft. The chapter that bears his name is his work and apart from some fairly extensive editing to improve its intelligibility to the general reader nobody else's.

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The key features that one requires in orientating themselves to this particular book is the unique ways that it came to be written. It is a book that stands apart in many respects from the rest of the published works of Carl Gustav Jung. He clearly desired for the wider world to understand his unique vision of the human psyche after decades of labor to uncover what he saw as the greatest mystery left to our understanding of ourselves: the depths of the unconscious. Being richly illustrated with examples of human symbolism across time and cultures, this text is a unique treasure for readers as it instructs with both word and image. We are introduced to this text by Jonathan Freeman who had interviewed Jung for the British Broadcasting Corporation in Freeman was clearly deeply affected by his time with Jung in Zurich. He was so impacted in fact that he worked very hard to convince Jung to write a book for a general audience.

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date. For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now. Javascript is not enabled in your browser. Enabling JavaScript in your browser will allow you to experience all the features of our site. Learn how to enable JavaScript on your browser. Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book.

2 thoughts on “Man and His Symbols by C.G. Jung

  1. Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather.

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