Visual pleasure and narrative cinema

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visual pleasure and narrative cinema

Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema by Laura Mulvey

Laura Mulvey is a British feminist film theorist. She was educated at St Hildas College, Oxford. She is currently professor of film and media studies at Birkbeck, University of London. She worked at the British Film Institute for many years before taking up her current position.

Mulvey is best known for her essay, Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema, written in 1973 and published in 1975 in the influential British film theory journal Screen. It later appeared in a collection of her essays entitled Visual and Other Pleasures, as well as in numerous other anthologies. Her article, which was influenced by the theories of Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan, is one of the first major essays that helped shift the orientation of film theory towards a psychoanalytic framework. Prior to Mulvey, film theorists such as Jean-Louis Baudry and Christian Metz used psychoanalytic ideas in their theoretical accounts of the cinema. Mulveys contribution, however, inaugurated the intersection of film theory, psychoanalysis and feminism.

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In Conversation With Laura Mulvey (Interview)

These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. Furthermore, they are construed primarily as mothers before all other characteristics. Mulvey contends that a psychoanalytic reading can be employed to understand and correct these wrongdoings.
Laura Mulvey

Mulvey’s “Visual Pleasure & Narrative Cinema” Without All the Psychoanalytic Theory

Laura Mulvey born 15 August is a British feminist film theorist. She was educated at St Hilda's College , Oxford. She is currently professor of film and media studies at Birkbeck, University of London. She worked at the British Film Institute for many years before taking up her current position. Mulvey is best known for her essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema", written in and published in in the influential British film theory journal Screen. It later appeared in a collection of her essays entitled Visual and Other Pleasures , as well as in numerous other anthologies.

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Laura Mulvey (born 15 August ) is a British feminist film theorist. She was educated at St Mulvey is best known for her essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema", written in and published in in the influential British film.
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Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema Summary

The book was recently promoted and discussed in a succession of symposia and public presentations in London, Gothenburg, Amsterdam, Groningen, and Utrecht. Later this year, Feminisms will be the topic of a public debate at Centre Pompidou in Paris. Fellow series editors Ian Christie and Dominique Chateau seemed to agree that this topic deserved its own publication. We thought that was a very generous offer. As you may recall, we immediately and full-heartedly accepted. We returned to you in with the suggestion that Anna Backman Rogers, then working with me at the University of Groningen, would be an ideal co-editor. You not only thought this a very good idea but soon decided with Anna that the angle on feminisms should be contemporary rather than historical.

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4 thoughts on “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema by Laura Mulvey

  1. Way back in the 70s and 80s, Laura Mulvey, Susan McClary, Catherine Clement and plenty of other feminist theorists showed how artworks cut up, dehumanized, eliminated, and often just straight up killed both women characters and feminized compositional features, and that this treatment of women and feminized compositional features worked, both narratively and formally, to produce pleasurable aesthetic experiences.

  2. Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. New York.

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