Joseph hooker battles and wars

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joseph hooker battles and wars

Fighting Joe Hooker by Walter H. Hebert

“I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appear to me to be sufficient reasons. And yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which, I am not quite satisfied with you.” With this opening sentence in a two-page letter from Abraham Lincoln, Union general Joseph Hooker (1814–79) gained a prominent place in Civil War history. Hooker assumed command of an army demoralized by defeat and diminished by desertion. Acting swiftly, the general reorganized his army, routed corruption among quartermasters, improved food and sanitation, and boosted morale by granting furloughs and amnesties. His hour of fame and the test of his military skill came in the May 1863 battle of Chancellorsville. It was one of the Union Army’s worst defeats; shortly thereafter Hooker’s resignation was accepted. This definitive biography of a man who could lead so brilliantly and yet fall so ignominiously remains the only full-length treatment of Hooker’s life. His renewal as an important commander in the western theater during the Chattanooga and Atlanta campaigns is discussed, as is his life before and after his Civil War military service. In a new introduction James A. Rawley, Carl Adolph Happold Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Nebraska, reminds today’s readers of Fighting Joe’s place in history.
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General John Bell Hood Lecture at the Historic Granbury Opera House in Hood County

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Joseph Hooker was a Union general during the American Civil War — and, for the first half of , commander of the Army of the Potomac. Nicknamed "Fighting Joe," Hooker was a Regular Army veteran with a checkered reputation—rumors of drunkenness dogged him for much of his career—and a talent for political infighting. When he took over the army from Ambrose E. Burnside after the debacle at Fredericksburg , the Army of the Potomac's morale was at an all-time low and desertion an all-time high. He reorganized its forces, virtually halted desertion, established reliable intelligence gathering, and, most important, boosted confidence. He also developed an elaborate plan secretly to flank Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia on the south side of the Rappahannock River, boasting to his army that "certain destruction awaits" the Confederates.

Joseph Hooker Facts

Joseph Hooker was a career U. Hooker entered the Civil War in as a brigadier general and gained a reputation as a reliable combat commander during the Peninsula Campaign and the Battle of Antietam. Hooker was beloved by his men for his morale-boosting improvements in food rations and medical care, but a surprising defeat at the Battle of Chancellorsville led to his resignation in June just days before the Battle of Gettysburg. He died in at the age of He later participated in the Mexican-American War as a staff officer, serving under the likes of famed General Winfield Scott and future U.

During this time Hooker earned the reputation of an aggressive leader who cared for the welfare of his men. Following a loss at Fredericksburg and a series of poor decisions Lincoln removed Burnside, promoting Hooker to the commander of the Army of the Potomac in early As commander of the Army of the Potomac, Hooker improved conditions for the soldiers including food, medical care, and leave. However, disagreements with his staff and commanders along with a loss to, Confederate commander, General Robert E. Mustered out of service in , he retired from the Army in , and is buried in Cincinnati, Ohio. Show your pride in battlefield preservation by shopping in our store.

He built a beaten force into a proud one and stole a march on Robert E. Lee with it. He was twenty-four hours away from winning the Civil War. Then he fell apart. What a concept.

1 thoughts on “Fighting Joe Hooker by Walter H. Hebert

  1. Raised locally, his family came from old New England stock and his grandfather had served as a captain during the American Revolution.

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