Why was tokugawa tsunayoshi important

9.40  ·  5,792 ratings  ·  216 reviews
why was tokugawa tsunayoshi important

Dog Shogun: The Personality and Policies of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi by Beatrice M. Bodart-Bailey

Tsunayoshi (1646-1709), the fifth Tokugawa shogun, is one of the most notorious figures in Japanese history. Viewed by many as a tyrant, his policies were deemed eccentric, extreme, and unorthodox. His Laws of Compassion, which made the maltreatment of dogs an offense punishable by death, earned him the nickname Dog Shogun, by which he is still popularly known today. However, Tsunayoshis rule coincides with the famed Genroku era, a period of unprecedented cultural growth and prosperity that Japan would not experience again until the mid-twentieth century. It was under Tsunayoshi that for the first time in Japanese history considerable numbers of ordinary townspeople were in a financial position to acquire an education and enjoy many of the amusements previously reserved for the ruling elite.

Based on a masterful re-examination of primary sources, this exciting new work by a senior scholar of the Tokugawa period maintains that Tsunayoshis notoriety stems largely from the work of samurai historians and officials who saw their privileges challenged by a ruler sympathetic to commoners. Beatrice Bodart-Baileys insightful analysis of Tsunayoshis background sheds new light on his personality and the policies associated with his shogunate. Tsunayoshi was the fourth son of Tokugawa Iemitsu (1604-1651) and left largely in the care of his mother, the daughter of a greengrocer. Under her influence, Bodart-Bailey argues, the future ruler rebelled against the values of his class. As evidence she cites the fact that, as shogun, Tsunayoshi not only decreed the registration of dogs, which were kept in large numbers by samurai and posed a threat to the populace, but also the registration of pregnant women and young children to prevent infanticide. He decreed, moreover, that officials take on the onerous tasks of finding homes for abandoned children and caring for sick travelers.

In the eyes of his detractors, Tsunayoshis interest in Confucian and Buddhist studies and his other intellectual pursuits were merely distractions for a dilettante. Bodart-Bailey counters that view by pointing out that one of Japans most important political philosophers, Ogyu Sorai, learned his craft under the fifth shogun. Sorai not only praised Tsunayoshis government, but his writings constitute the theoretical framework for many of the rulers controversial policies. Another salutary aspect of Tsunayoshis leadership that Bodart-Bailey brings to light is his role in preventing the famines and riots that would have undoubtedly taken place following the worst earthquake and tsunami as well as the most violent eruption of Mount Fuji in history--all of which occurred during the final years of Tsunayoshis shogunate.

The Dog Shogun is a thoroughly revisionist work of Japanese political history that touches on many social, intellectual, and economic developments as well. As such it promises to become a standard text on late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth-century Japan.
File Name: why was tokugawa tsunayoshi important.zip
Size: 28605 Kb
Published 25.10.2019

BRIBE TO WIN - Tokugawa (Legendary) - Total War: Shogun 2 - Ep.01!

The Dog Shogun: The Personality and Policies of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi

Tokugawa Tsunayoshi , born Feb. Proclaimed shogun in , Tsunayoshi presided over one of the most prosperous and peaceful periods in Japanese history. Toward the end of his career, however, Tsunayoshi tended to ignore the duties of government for the pleasures of his palace, and the government became somewhat lax and at times eccentric , as evident in his notorious decrees relating to the welfare of dogs. Born in the Year of the Dog, Tsunayoshi was influenced by a Buddhist monk who told him he had been a dog in his previous existence. As a result, Tsunayoshi decreed the death penalty for anyone who harmed a dog, insisted that dogs be addressed only in honorific terms, and kept an estimated 50, of them at government expense, feeding them on a choice diet of rice and dried fish. Tokugawa Tsunayoshi. Info Print Cite.

By Beatrice M. University of Hawai'i Press, In this tendentious biography of one of Tokugawa Japan's most colorful, controversial characters, Beatrice Bodart-Bailey makes large claims for her hero. Tsunayoshi, the fifth Tokugawa shogun, was not the effeminate, sex-addled mother's boy of popular lore, but a wise statesman, shrewd in his judgments, who received his bad reputation because he put the welfare of commoners ahead of his class's interests. The infamous "Laws of Compassion," which stipulated stern punishments for maltreatment of animals, should be seen as an attempt to civilize the samurai by taking away opportunities to kill. In choosing as his advisers men he had made rather than daimyo already entrenched in the system, he followed the path defined by Machiavelli and taken by absolutist rulers in Europe. By employing men of talent whatever their hereditary status, he brought about a paradigm shift in the governance of early modern Japan that presaged the modern bureaucratic state.

Tsunayoshi — , the fifth Tokugawa shogun, is one of the most notorious figures in Japanese history. Viewed by many as a tyrant, his policies were deemed eccentric, extreme, and unorthodox. His Laws of Compassion, which made the maltreatment of dogs an offense punishable by death, earned him the nickname Dog Shogun, by which he is still popularly known today. It was under Tsunayoshi that for the first time in Japanese history considerable numbers of ordinary townspeople were in a financial position to acquire an education and enjoy many of the amusements previously reserved for the ruling elite. Tsunayoshi was the fourth son of Tokugawa Iemitsu — and left largely in the care of his mother, the daughter of a greengrocer. Under her influence, Bodart-Bailey argues, the future ruler rebelled against the values of his class. As evidence she cites the fact that, as shogun, Tsunayoshi not only decreed the registration of dogs, which were kept in large numbers by samurai and posed a threat to the populace, but also the registration of pregnant women and young children to prevent infanticide.

His rule is described as being quite strict at times, but as also quite arbitrary, and Tsunayoshi is generally regarded as one of the least competent of the shoguns.
how to listen to audiobooks for free

Navigation menu

SHOGUN -- Tsunayoshi Tokugawa, Japan

He was the younger brother of Tokugawa Ietsuna , thus making him the son of Tokugawa Iemitsu , the grandson of Tokugawa Hidetada , and the great-grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Tsunayoshi is known for instituting animal protection laws, particularly for dogs. He had a dog named Takemaru. Tokugawa Tsunayoshi was born on February 23, , in Edo. Tsunayoshi had an elder brother already five years old, who would become the next shogun after Iemitsu's death, Tokugawa Ietsuna.

Tsunayoshi was the fifth in a line of 15 Tokugawa-family rulers. His year rule was marked by an unusual number of natural disasters, including a volcanic eruption of Mount Fuji, and by that equally unusual outbreak of commerce — the arts, extravagance and indulgence now known as the Genroku Period. The shogun himself is usually described as the most eccentric of his line. In addition to such a dishonored public image was a disreputable private life. Though he managed to father two children, his tastes, it is said, lay elsewhere. This was not in itself unusual.

.

4 thoughts on “Dog Shogun: The Personality and Policies of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi by Beatrice M. Bodart-Bailey

Leave a Reply